Survival, growth and photochemical efficiency of silver fir seedlings produced with different technologies

Robakowski P., Pietrzak T., Kowalkowski W., Małecki G. (2021). Survival, growth and photochemical efficiency of silver fir seedlings produced with different technologies. New Forests, 1-23.

Forest tree seedling production technologies impact reforestation success determined with survival and quality of seedlings. Five Abies alba seedling production technologies were tested: (1) bare-root seedling, three years in the open (3/0); (2) bare-root seedling, two years under a shading net (40% of full light), a year in the open (2/g); (3) ball root seedling, two years under a shading net (40%), a year in the open (2/K); (4) bare-root seedling grown in an opening in a Norway spruce stand (3/Pic); (5) bare-root seedling, three years under Scots pine canopy (3/Pin). Silver fir seedlings acclimatized their growth rates to the common growing environment in relation to the seedling production technology used in the nurseries. The height and diameter at root collar were positively correlated with survival. The 3/Pic seedlings manifested the lowest survival and were lower than other seedlings in terms of height and photochemical efficiency. The needle photochemistry of seedlings growing two years in plantation was determined by their earlier acclimation to the nursery light conditions. The production technology determined the ability of A. alba seedlings to acclimatize to the natural environment. Ball root seedlings grown two years in shade and a year in the open (2/K) acclimatized better to the full light environment compared with bare-root seedlings produced in canopy shade, and they are likely more suitable to be planted after clearcutting.

https://doi.org/10.1007/s11056-021-09835-4

Keywords: Abies alba, chlorophyll a fluorescence, forest nursery, growth, photoinhibition